DESIGN EDUCATORS

Educators from across the country will gather in intensive educator-only sessions to discuss “Head, Heart, Hand” and how it relates to the field of teaching. Beginning on October 10 at 8:30 a.m., attendees will choose from several workshops, moderated conversations and panels throughout the day.

Please note that fees apply to some sessions.

Pecha Kuchas

Stop by room 101I on Thursday, October 10, from 7:30–8:30 p.m. and watch fast-paced presentations performed by fellow design educators.

Educator Poster Show

Join us in the Design Fair during the opening night reception for the educators poster show on Thursday, October 10 from 6:30–8:30 p.m. Chat with colleagues and fellow design educators, view work and research from educators across the country.

Am I eligible for the educator rate?

At this time, the educator rate is available to AIGA members who identify as educators in the AIGA design community. The rate is determined by your current membership status.

Oct. 10, 2013
8:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Presented by the AIGA Design Educators Community

Sponsored by Adobe

Workshops, moderated conversations and panels by educators, for educators.

8:30 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Michael R. Gibson, The University of North Texas
Room 101B, Level One

Fee: $40

Effective research, whether it has the word “design” placed in front of it or not, is deliberate. It is guided by formalized processes that help those who employ them collect, process, synthesize, distill, evaluate and use data to generate value, new knowledge and—in the case of design research—authentic solutions. Design research, as part of the fundamental learning experience that underpins a design curriculum, achieves two primary goals on behalf of real-world populations and individuals. First, it imbues students and faculty with the necessary thinking abilities and empathy to design in a contextually aware manner. Second, it helps these students and faculty learn to recognize, strategically operationalize and critically evaluate opportunities to develop breakthrough products, programs, communications systems, experiences and services.

This workshop will familiarize participants with select strategic and tactical means for introducing students to the process of gathering and synthesizing the knowledge gleaned from analyzing human experiences. Participants will also be presented with information that will help them incorporate learning experiences informed by design research into their curriculums.

8:30 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Annabelle Gould, University of Washington
Room 101C, Level One

A moderated conversation with Annabelle Gould

What constitutes an effective graduate thesis in design? What sorts of questions form a “valid” area of inquiry? How much research versus making or writing is necessary to deliver a final thesis? These are all commonly raised questions about guiding a graduate thesis. While outcomes and timelines vary among programs, at present there isn’t a set of common guidelines around which to form and judge a thesis. This discussion, open to educators who are involved in graduate design programs and thesis committees, will act as an open forum where participants can exchange ideas about what constitutes a valid thesis project.

8:30 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Dori Griffin, University of Southern Mississippi; Gary Rozanc, Columbia College Chicago; Andrea Marks, Oregon State University; Pamela Napier, Herron School of Art & Design; Andre Murnieks, University of Notre Dame; Terri Wada, Herron School of Art and Design
Room 101D, Level One

A selection of presentations on design thinking in the context of design education featuring: Dori Griffin, University of Southern Mississippi, “The Question of Relative Merit: Teaching Students to Evaluate the Design Solutions”; Andrea Marks, Oregon State University, “A Senior Project”; Andre Murnieks, University of Notre Dame, “Telling a Design Story”; Pamela Napier and Terri Wada, Herron School of Art and Design, “The Power of Design Thinking”; and Gary Rozanc, Columbia College Chicago, “Instituting an Inquiry-based Design Pedagogy”

8:30 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Maria Rogal, University of Florida; Don Dempsey, Cabrini College; Leslie Friesen, University of Louisville; Karen Bright, Monmouth University; Brooke Scherer, University of Tampa
Room 101E, Level One

A selection of presentations on social impact in the context of design education featuring: Karen Bright, Monmouth University, “For the Love of Type”; Don Dempsey, Cabrini College, “Graphic Design and the Capstone Project: Connecting with the Core”; Leslie Friesen, University of Louisville, “Successes and Challenges in Teaching a Pro Bono Community Engagement Course”; Maria Rogal, University of Florida, “Out of the Studio, Into the Field”; and Brooke Scherer, University of Tampa, “Consciously Creative: Where Sustainability Meets Design Education”.

10:30 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Bernard Canniffe, Ringling College of Art and Design
Room 101B, Level One

Fee: $40

This workshop focuses on how to effectively engage communities in meaningful and relevant work. In this session, participants will go through a series of creative exercises that foster conversation and collaboration. This is an ideal workshop for educators and designers who are looking to develop courses or projects in—and with—communities. Bernard Canniffe has led this workshop at design conferences and universities around the world.

10:30 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Petrula Vrontikis, Art Center College of Design
Room 101C, Level One

A moderated conversation with Petrula Vrontikis

One of the motivations paramount to educators is mentoring. Joining Petrula Vrontikis, Terry Irwin, Michael Vanderbyl, Louise Sandhaus and Eric Heiman will share anecdotes about influential design educators and the life-changing relationships that shaped their careers. The discussion will explore both sides of the experience, as reciprocity is at the heart of the mentorship. Attendees will also explore how helping others discover and channel their potential and passion can impact the next generation leaders in design and education.

10:30 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Lisa Fontaine, Iowa State University; Jeanne Komp, Cabrini College; Laura Huaracha, Carthage College; Heather Corcoran, Washington University in St. Louis
Room 101D, Level One

A selection of presentations on design thinking in the context of design education featuring: Heather Corcoran, Washington University in St. Louis, “Building Digital Tools in Health and Education: New Opportunities for Group and Individual Learning”; Lisa Fontaine, Iowa State University, “Learning Design by Designing Learning Experiences: A Case Study in the Development of Strategic Thinking Skills Through the Design of Interactive Exhibitions”; Laura Huaracha, Carthage College, “Utilizing Interdisciplinary Heads: Teaching the Visualization of Ecological and Conservative Issues”; Jeanne Komp, Cabrini College, “Multidisciplinary Learning in Graphic Design Education”; and Gabriel Schaffzin, Massachusetts College of Art and Design, “A Dialectic on Speculative Design in the Service of Innovative Design Pedagogy”.

10:30 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Cassie Hester, University of West Georgia; Sherry Saunders, Lamar University; Erica Chaikin, University of Houston; Suzanne Powney, Mississippi State University; Sherry Blankenship, Ohio University; Roselynn Newton, Texas State University
Room 101E, Level One

A selection of presentations on the craft of design in the context of design education featuring: Sherry Blankenship, Ohio University, “A New Foundations Program”; Erica Chaikin, University of Houston, “Making by Hand”; Cassie Hester and Joey Hannaford, University of West Georgia, “The Play Instinct in Design Education”; Suzanne Powney, Mississippi State University and Roselynn Newton, Texas State University, “Tactile Impression: The Reemergence of Craft Through Letterpress in a Typographic Design Curriculum”; and Sherry Saunders, Lamar University, “Coding as Craft?”.

1:30 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Lara McCormick, New Hampshire Institute of Art
Room 101B, Level One

Fee: $40

Now more than ever, the ability to hand letter offers designers a wider range of typographic solutions than what’s available digitally. How do we teach hand lettering in the curriculum? At what level in a student’s design education should it be introduced? This hands-on workshop will focus on different ways to approach teaching hand lettering. Participants will be introduced to various styles and executions of lettering, and they will learn how these elements can be applied in graphic design. Attendees will also receive resources and guidelines that may be taken back to the classroom. 

1:30 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Piyush Patel, Digital Tutors
Room 101C, Level One

A moderated conversation with Piyush Patel

Everyday it becomes exponentially harder to manage and prepare today’s design classroom and curriculum. Design instructors have to juggle constantly changing software, shifting administrative requirements and evolving design trends, which can lead to a frustrating teaching and learning experience. This session will help you learn techniques to address the roadblocks you encounter and focus on what matters most: helping your students prepare for their creative careers.

 

1:30 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Maribeth Kradel-Weitzel, Philadelphia University; Marty Lane, Kansas City Art Institute; Jonathan Cook, University of Washington; Carolyn Staples, University of Tennessee; Frank Baseman, Philadelphia University; Neil Ward, University of Tennessee
Room 101D, Level One

A selection of presentations on design thinking in the context of design education featuring: Frank Baseman, Philadelphia University, “The Trials and Tribulations of Working on Real-World Interdisciplinary Projects”; Jonathan Cook, University of Washington, “Preparing Students for the Growing Context of Design Practice”; Maribeth Kradel-Weitzel and Ronald Kander, Philadelphia University, “A New Model for Interdisciplinary Education”; Marty Lane and Jamie Gray, Kansas City Art Institute, “Tailoring Communication Experiences”; and Carolyn Staples and Neil Ward, University of Tennessee, “Designer Research Game”.

1:30 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Jessica Barness, Kent State University; Julie Longo, University of Minnesota; Joshua Singer, San Francisco State University; Cyndi Wiley, Grand View University; Aaron Ganci, Herron School of Art & Design; Stacy Asher, San Francisco State University
Room 101E, Level One

A selection of presentations on social impact in the context of design education featuring: Jessica Barness, Kent State University, “Translating Science with Design's Personal Voices: Toward A Critical Collaboration”; Aaron Ganci, Herron School of Art and Design, “Finding Real Problems: Using Participatory Design Research Methods to Help Students Propose and Design New Applications”; Julie Longo, University of Minnesota, “Change by Design: Stories of Experience, Strength and Hope”; Joshua Singer and Stacy Asher, San Francisco State University, “Crafting Stories About Water and the City: Transdisciplinary Design Collaboration for Social Impact and Pedagogical Methods”; and Cyndi Wiley, Grand View University, “Empathy, Connectivity, Authenticity, Trust and Spirituality: A Pedagogical Framework for Interaction Design”. 

Oct. 11, 2013
7:15 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.
Auditorium Room 1, Level One

Join this session to gain an in-depth understanding of what it means to be a Creative Cloud member. Your creativity will be reignited once you see the latest updates to the tools and services you love. Plus, you’ll learn how you can use your traditional design skills to create HTML websites and produce cutting-edge iPad publications—without writing code. You’ll also find new ways to collaborate with your teams and clients and learn how to share your greatest work with the creative community using Behance ProSite. This workshop is free and pre-registration is encouraged.

11:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

Choose to attend one of a dozen affinity sessions on subjects ranging from typography and design theory to branding and globalism.

11:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
Lara McCormick, New Hampshire Institute of Art; Jay Coogan, Minneapolis College of Art & Design; Amy Johnson, University of Central Oklahoma
Room 101F, Level One

This panel will address the role design education plays in igniting social change. Topics include the “Design for Good for Education” initiative, student-run practices and the MCAD Works program, an umbrella for community service projects.

2:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.

Choose to attend one of a dozen affinity sessions on subjects ranging from typography and design theory to branding and globalism.

2:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Michael R. Gibson, The University of North Texas; Sean Donahue, Art Center College of Design
Room 101F, Level One

The challenges that now confront emerging designers as they transition from the collegiate landscape into the multilayered landscape of contemporary practice are far more complex than they were ten—or even five—years ago. Future designers must now enter the dynamic, ever-evolving world of our profession equipped not only with traditional “craft” knowledge but also with the conceptual wherewithal necessary to combine knowledge from different disciplines, or to create new knowledge as a means to guide intricate design formulations, processes and assessments. Truly effective designers must now understand and come to grips with the many ways human needs map to the social, technological, emotional, economic and political realities that contextualize them—in all their inherent complexity. The presenters discuss design research, thinking and strategy in the context of design education.

Oct. 12, 2013
11:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

Choose to attend one of a dozen affinity sessions on subjects ranging from typography and design theory to branding and globalism.

11:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
Ruki Ravikumar, University of Central Oklahoma; Karin Jager, University of the Fraser Valley; Diane Mikhael, Virginia Commonwealth University in Qatar; Muneera Umedaly-Spence, Middle East Design Educators Association; Mariana Amatullo, Art Center College of Design
Room 101E, Level One

The role of design educators is as dynamic and ever-changing as the discipline of design. Design educators are continually faced with a need to expand their capacity in the classroom in order to prepare students to successfully practice and compete in the global marketplace. This panel—consisting of design educators representing AIGA, Society of Graphic Designers of Canada, Cumulus and Middle East Design Educators Association—will discuss the relevance of design education, the need for cultural empathy and the challenges and changing roles of design educators in a global context.